CHECK OUT MY BOOKS ON AMAZON (PAPERBACK AND OR KINDLE) CLICK ON ANY SCROLLING WIDGET BUTTON

CHECK OUT MY BOOKS ON AMAZON CLICK ON ANY BOOK ON THE SCROLLING WIDGET THX FOR READING :)

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

DRACULA ON MERCURY THEATER ON THE AIR

SCARIEST OLD TIME RADIO EPISODES? - Before internet, cable and satellite--the network television channels we think of today--began as broadcast radio. The same way good writing employs zero narrative distance, there is something about sitting in a dark room, listening to a scary old time radio play. The following are arguably the best-of-the-best tales of the supernatural from yesteryear. 

Sunday, August 23, 2015

NOSFERATU


NOSFERATU - The iconic 1922 silent film is the stuff of nightmares, so realistic the lead actor was rumored to have been an actual vampire, in the tribute film entitled ‘Shadow of the Vampire’. ‘Nosferatu’ was an unauthorized adaptation of ‘Dracula’, it’s studio Prana Films was immediately embroiled in lawsuits, brought by heirs to the Bram Stoker estate. It made it’s one and only film then went bankrupt to avoid copyright infringement. Courts at the time ruled that the film be destroyed, however a few prints were salvaged and the film came to be lauded, as a triumph of horror cinema. The film’s use of angles, light and shadow--along with locations in Germany and Slovakia, shot by single camera--was probably intended to be color tinted, which didn’t happen. There is a rumored remake in the works, by Robert Eggers, director of ‘The Witch’.










 


NOSFERATU 1922 full movie

Sunday, August 16, 2015

THE MAN WHO LOVED FLOWERS SHORT STORY REVIEW

THE MAN WHO LOVED FLOWERS - The Man Who Loved Flowers by Stephen King appeared in Gallery magazine and his anthology Night Shift. In New York City an unnamed man stops at a flower vendor, mentions a woman's body, a hammer murderer, so he buys roses for ‘Norma’ and leaves. Walking down the sidewalk he turns into an alley saying to a random woman: "I've bought some flowers for you, Norma." When she screams he kills her. After an unspecified amount of time, he walks away. He feels optimistic, sure that he will find Norma someday. Stephen King is one of the best known and most prolific horror writers. His works have been appeared in novels, short stories, collections, movies and TV. Since his first book ‘Carrie’ in 1974 he is still going strong in 2015 with ‘Finders Keepers’ and countless projects in-between.

Follow these links to related posts on this topic.







Wednesday, August 12, 2015

LESBIAN PULPS

LESBIAN PULPS  - A series dedicated to pulps, see links below and follow them to those pages. Lesbian theme paperback/ pulp books were mostly written by straight men for themselves. These pulps (written by males) tended to have darker or more titillating undertones. Paperbacks with sympathetic themes were usually written by women. Radclyffe Hall and Tereska Torres are often credited with launching the golden age of publishing the lesbian pulp; with Women's Barracks in 1950 and The Well of Loneliness reprint in 1951. However it emerged as a new market for women writers, some of them lesbian, who might have never been published otherwise. Fifteen actual lesbians wrote almost a hundred of these pulps, from 1950-1965, reflecting realistic lifestyles. Many pulps written by men had probably never even known a lesbian. Imagining them as wannabe males or sexually confused, easily remedied by the right man. Interestingly, writer Lawrence Block--writing as Jill Emerson and Sheldon Lord--went on to pen award winning mysteries (A Walk Among the Tombstones). This post has attempted to show both sides of the coin: sympathetic realism and sensationalistic perversion.

Related posts on this topic:

Flying Lesbian by Del Britt
Women's Barracks by Tereska Torres
Queer Patterns by Lilyan Brock
Women Confidential by Lee Mortimer
Three Women by March Hastings
The Other Side of Desire by Paula Christian
The Unnatural Wife by Jay Carr
69 Barrow Street by Sheldon Lord
Getting Off  by Jill Emerson
Enough of Sorrow by Jill Emerson
Lesbian Web of Evil by Harry Gregory
The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall