CHECK OUT MY BOOKS ON AMAZON (PAPERBACK AND OR KINDLE) CLICK ON ANY SCROLLING WIDGET BUTTON

CHECK OUT MY BOOKS ON AMAZON CLICK ON ANY BOOK ON THE SCROLLING WIDGET THX FOR READING :)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

ADOBE BOOKS GALLERY SURVIVAL ADAPTATIONS

Adobe Books Gallery Survival Adaptations - An article I wrote for San Francisco cooperative gallery, entitled ‘Writer’s Survival Guide to Living in San Francisco’, was featured in Adobe Books Backroom Gallery recent exhibition and chapbook. In their press release, Adobe Books says: “Survival Adaptations dictate that in order to survive and thrive in specific environments, animal species have developed a host of amazing characteristics.” In a later post, I will post the entire article verbatim, as it appeared in the chapbook. The article also features content by the San Francisco artist Solis. 












Wednesday, September 10, 2014

SOCIAL MEDIA STATS

Blogger stats: 43,786 page views as of September 2014

Goodreads stats: 5,246 friends as of September 2014
Twitter stats: 25,200 followers as of September 2014

Monday, September 1, 2014

A DAY BY WILLIAM TREVOR

A Day by William Trevor - In William Trevor’s short story, entitled ‘A Day’, the author successfully immerses the reader in the point-of-view character’s consciousness. We wake with Mrs. Lethwes as she watches her husband sleep, as she goes marketing and stops by the coffee shop. We listen to her chat and eavesdrop on her thoughts. Her nerves deepen, growing more serious, while day turns to night. She is trying to reconcile herself to her husband's affair. ‘A Day’ is featured in William Trevor’s 1996 collection ‘After Rain’. In his own words, Trevor says: “My fiction may, now and again, illuminate aspects of the human condition, but I do not consciously set out to do so.”

Sunday, August 17, 2014

REVIEW OF MIDWINTER BY MARTIN PHILLIPS

REVIEW OF MIDWINTER BY MARTIN PHILLIPS – “Chad Schimke's tale of an ancient Welsh royal bloodline reads seamlessly and flawlessy, from generation to generation over many hundreds of years. You feel as though you know these ancient people, understand their primitiveness, their relation to, understanding of and worship of nature, of Mother Earth, and their ethereal bond with the blue stone, which, surprisingly, the reader learns is Stonehenge. You feel part of the family, sense how the people actually lived, feel a kinship with the lone pine (I won't wreck it, don't worry) and the savageness of tribal warfare for not simply dominance, but survival. The reader weaves in and out of the consciousness and thoughts of individuals like a waft of smoke or a gentle breeze. It is a story I simply could not stop reading once I'd started. You will, too! (Or Should).